Blogging Consistently, Part 1

Consistency is an uphill battle...but it's worth the struggle.

Okay, it’s time for another round of Full Disclosure:

I suck. It’s been almost two weeks since my last post on here, and I have absolutely no excuse for being so lax in my writing. Guess I haven’t been living up to my blog’s name, have I?

What follows may sound like a list of excuses, which you should know I’m completely against. So, please know this next part isn’t meant to excuse me from my writing. It’s meant to be a quick summary of my past month of blogging: where I succeeded, and where I fell short.

I started the year optimistic and enthusiastic about where I’d be taking my blog. Within a week, I had five detailed posts under my belt, grown a small following of other students in The Daily Post’s Blogging 101 course, and connected with established bloggers through backlinks and comments. Things were going great.

I believe I kept up the pace for the first two weeks of the course. I know I missed one assignment that was fairly inconsequential to my needs and goals, and I was okay with that. It didn’t seem like a big deal – especially because I had otherwise remained consistent in my posting.

But then, as it is want to do, life threw a few things my way that needed my immediate attention. I put my blog on the backburner for a few days, knowing I could come back to it when I was ready and able to focus on my writing.

Right there is where the problem began. Saying I’d come back to it “when I’m ready” was such an ambiguous statement that I started rationalizing not blogging by saying I “wasn’t in the mood” or “would get to it soon.” Ahh, tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow…

But enough about my sob story. Like I said, I made excuses to myself, but that doesn’t mean it’s okay to slack off. I’ll bite the bullet, fess up, and move on.

At least it gave me something to write about today…


Today, I’ll be talking about blogging consistently, and why it’s important to audience retention and growth, as well as SEO rankings.

Audience Retention

Imagine a new store opens up in your neighborhood advertising state-of-the-art electronics, gadgets, and gizmos at prices that blow the nearest chain store out of the water. You take a walk downtown during an afternoon off to check it out, only to see a “Sorry, We’re Closed” sign in the window. Confused, you look for a sign telling you the store’s hours of operations, but there is none. You call the next day to get more info, and are told “Well, we might be open for the rest of the day, but we might not be. I’m not sure if anyone will be in tomorrow, either. On Friday, we’ll definitely be closed – we want to enjoy a long weekend.”

Sounds crazy, doesn’t it?

When will you "be back"? Your audience needs to know!
What, exactly, is your idea of “shortly”?

No matter how awesome every other aspect of the store is, if it only operates whenever the owner or manager “feels like it,” it’ll never succeed. Customers will just end up going elsewhere, even if it means spending a little extra money – as long as they can be sure they’ll actually get what they want.

I’m sure you can see where I’m going with this.

I’ve said it before: A blog is not created for the sake of the blogger; it’s for the audience. And audience members will only stick around if they can rely on the blog’s creator to provide valuable content on a consistent basis. There are hundreds – if not thousands – of other places to get similar information on the Internet. If you’re not providing what your audience wants, they’ll find someone else who will.

This isn’t to say you should hit the ground running and never stop.

Let’s revisit the store metaphor. What if the owner started out by keeping the store open for forty hours a week, before it had built a large customer base? The amount of wasted electricity and manpower would likely be enough to sink the business before it ever got moving. At the very least, he would immediately have to scale back its operational hours – which, to its customers, would appear to be writing on the wall symbolizing problems with the business in general. They wouldn’t be able to trust any guarantees or warranties given by the store, and would end up choosing a more reputable place to do business with.

Again, I’m sure you can see where I’m going with this.

If your blog’s audience sees that you haven’t posted in weeks (after getting used to reading something new every day), what are they going to think? They’ll believe you’re getting lazy, or you ran out of ideas, or simply don’t care about whatever cause you “dedicated yourself to” in your initial blog post. They’ll end up finding a more reliable source of information, and will leave your blog behind.

Audience Growth

Of course, you want to do more than simply retain the readers you already have. The ultimate goal of any blog is to see its readership grow.

The more you post, the wider your reach becomes. A blogger who consistently comes up with new topics to write about will reach a wide variety of audience members – all individuals looking to fill a specific need.

As your blog – and your audience –  grows, you’ll gain the momentum needed to keep pushing. And it will become easier and easier to sustain an intensive blogging schedule.

When you only have a small audience base, creating post after post can be draining (side note: I love you guys, your comments have been amazing, but I can’t dedicate two hours each and every day to something only a handful of people are reading!).

If my audience consisted of thousands of individuals – which may result in contracted freelance work, or more – I’d be more than happy to dedicate a huge chunk of every day to creating engaging content for my own blog. But if my blog posts aren’t paying the bills, it simply can’t be my top priority

Like with any other business, as I said, a blog should grow with its audience. Find a balance. Create enough engaging content that your audience slowly but surely increases in numbers. But don’t dive in so fast that you get burnt out and let down the people who gave you a chance in the first place. Do that, and your initial efforts will all be for naught.

Search Engine Optimization

Sure, your audience can grow through word-of-mouth (your own, or your current audience members’). But you can also make Google and other search engines work for you – if you’re consistent.

As you gain a deeper understanding of SEO, you’ll start to see it’s not all about keyword stuffing and cloaking. Google’s algorithms are getting smarter and smarter, and can see through these spammy techniques right away.

Search engine rankings go even deeper than calculating the amount of visits a page gets, too. Google now records how long a visitor stays on a specific site or page, as well. It uses these data to calculate a site’s dwell time, which Neil Patel calls “a critical, but often overlooked facet of search optimization.”

(Side note: Finish reading this article before you check out that link. I’ll give you the basics, and let Neil dive deeper afterwards)

Anyways, what does this have to do with consistency?

The answer to that question is two-fold:

  1. Consistent content = consistent pageviews = higher SEO ranking
  2. Fresh content = more crawling done by search engines = higher SEO ranking

The first part of this is just common sense. Much like the shop that maintains steady business hours, your blog will be visited by readers during the times they would expect to see new content. And as your audience returns, they’ll end up spending more time on your page in the process (perhaps checking out other posts they may have missed, or articles full of information that supplements the new post). All of these actions performed by your reader while logged on to your site make you look beautiful in the eyes of search engines.

But, if you’re inconsistent with your posting, your audience won’t know when to expect something new, and may not come back at all.

***

The second part of that answer – search engine crawling – is a little more technical.

I’ll try to keep it simple (for myself as much as for you!). Search engines are programmed to “crawl” web pages as they are updated. If your blog lays dormant for long periods of time, it stops being noticed by these search engine “bots.” (I really want to make some sort of “cob-World Wide-web” pun, but I’ll spare you from that torture)

A deserted blog will end up collecting virtual cobwebs.
What, exactly, is your idea of “shortly”?

Think of it like this: a restaurant reviewer isn’t going to go back to an eatery he’s reviewed in the past and order the same meal, right? He wouldn’t have anything new to say, and would only be wasting his time.

On the other hand, if the restaurant adds something new to the menu, the reviewer will be more likely to go back and try it out – knowing he’ll have new material to work with.

The more you update your blog – with valuable content, mind you – the more attention you’ll get from search engine bots. Every time you update your blog, you’re virtually raising your hand above the horde of other websites out there, saying “Hey! Check me out! I got some new stuff to show you!” 

Again, the “new stuff” you have to show off better be good, or it won’t matter how often you update your site. Don’t be like the kid in class who answers every question the teacher asks incorrectly just so he gets noticed. You’ll only gain the ire of the virtual Raymond Reddington’s of the World Wide Web.

 


It really is that simple.

Just kidding, it’s really not. But I’ll explain more about that in future posts. For now, just know that if you want to retain and grow your audience, whether through human or computerized recommendations, one of the most important facets to keep in mind is providing valuable content on a consistent basis.

But how, exactly, do you keep the ball rolling? How can you stay consistent in such a busy, hectic world?

We’ll discuss that next time. I’m sure you’ve had enough of me by now =)

In the meantime, I want to know: What are your experiences with starting and maintaining a blog? Have you had any trouble staying consistent? What have you done to stay motivated? Have you changed your routine at all to accommodate your blogging? Let’s start up a discussion down below!

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